Tag Archives: School-Aged Children

Talking About Feelings

Helping Your Child Who’s In a Funk

Helping Your Child Who’s In a Funk

When Janice and Paul's daughter turned 7, they breathed a sigh of relief. Last year Emily's favorite word was "no," and she talked back constantly. Alas, now she seemed worried and sad. She felt that no one liked her at school, that the other kids thought she was weird.

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adoption conversation

The Continuing Adoption Conversation

Around age six or seven, children start to wonder, "Who am I?" This is when our children can truly understand that joining your family through adoption means they left another.

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Mother and son teaching "Adoption 101"

“Adoption 101 in Room 26”

When presenting adoption to 10-year-olds, the teacher's cooperation and your child's involvement are key.

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A family working together to make a lifebook

Thanks for the Memories!

A lifebook can fill in the gaps of your child's early story — and creating it can be a fun project for all of you.

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Two children before their mother's adoption presentation

“Just Like Mrs. Bear”

With the right props and preparation, my adoption presentation to my son's first-grade class went wonderfully. He was proud to be a part of it, and I was proud of him.

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How to deal with adoption embarrassment

“Don’t Tell Anyone I Was Adopted”

The school year brings the realization that not every child has two sets of parents. Here's how to help your child cope.

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Adopting an older child can be rewarding

“What We Wish We Had Known”

Looking back, I began the journey of adopting an older child somewhat naively. My daughter and I agree that these seven truths could have made our path to happy a little bit easier.

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Alleviating children's financial worries

Alleviating Children’s Money Worries

The recession is a grown-up problem, but kids may be having money-related concerns of their own. Here's how to calm their fears.

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Tips for discussing adoption in the classroom.

Talking About Adoption in the Classroom

Some parents choose to talk to their child’s teacher about adoption. Others believe it’s a private matter. Here’s how your fellow readers weigh in.

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Tips for explaining adoption to classmates.

Finding the Right Words at School

When questions about adoption start circulating at my son's school, I step in with a tried-and-true presentation.

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A mother wondering whether her daughter should repeat kindergarten

Should You Tell the Teacher that Your Child was Adopted?

Should you tell the teacher that your child was adopted? What happens when your child doesn't share your ability to learn? Parents share advice and offer support on these and other questions.

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HappyEndingsPhoto

Happy Endings

The end of the school year can be stressful for children and parents. Here’s a guide for making it a smoother transition.

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How to start talking about birth parents with your child.

Mommy, Where Did I Come From?

Many adoptive parents mistake talking about the culture or place their child is from is enough. Learn why talking about birth parents matters.

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One mom explains special needs adoption to her son's class.

“I’m a Lot Like You”

In a letter to her son’s kindergarten class, a ghost-writing mom explains what it means to be adopted and to have cerebral palsy.

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