Talking to Kids

Talking About Feelings

Helping Your Child Who’s In a Funk

Helping Your Child Who’s In a Funk

When Janice and Paul's daughter turned 7, they breathed a sigh of relief. Last year Emily's favorite word was "no," and she talked back constantly. Alas, now she seemed worried and sad. She felt that no one liked her at school, that the other kids thought she was weird.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
A child learns about adoption birth stories.

“Was I Alone in the Hospital?”

Seeing where she was born—where she stayed with her birth mom and where we met her—gave my daughter greater confidence in her adoption story.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
Digital Scrapbooking

Making Memories

Digital scrapbooking is the easy, new way to preserve your memories–and adoptive parents are leading the way!

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
A new puppy can trigger an adoption conversation

Starting the Adoption Conversation

Keep talks with your child simple and relaxed. Your ease with discussing adoption lays the groundwork for a lifelong dialogue.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
Adoption Experts answer your questions.

Ask AF: Feeling Left Out of a Birth Family

Our seven-year-old biological son seems to swing between feeling left out because his siblings (both adopted) have "other families" to feeling that they can't be part of our family because they have "other" families.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
Kids need to piece together their adoption stories

Sharing Difficult Details with Your Child

Experts offer talking tips and sample language for discussing neglect, abuse, abandonment, and other painful parts of your child's adoption story.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
identity-formation-in-adolescence

Birth Parents on Their Minds

Your teen probably spends a lot of time thinking (or fantasizing) about her birth mother. Here's how to get some of those thoughts out in the open.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
Movies about adoption or foster care can be a great resource

Adoption Films for Family Movie Night

Use this guide to plan a family movie night or two this season. These flicks will captivate your kids, and open up adoption talks long after the credits have rolled.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
Gotcha Day

Parent-to-Parent: The Great Gotcha Debate

The term "Gotcha Day" has ardent fans and strong detractors in the adoption community. We asked Adoptive Families readers how they feel about it, and whether they use the term in their family. Here's what you said.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
adoption conversation

The Continuing Adoption Conversation

Most of us broached the topic of adoption when our children were infants or toddlers, and have been talking aver since. But around age six or seven, when all children start to wonder, "Who am I?", is when our children can truly understand that joining your family means they left another. Depending on their nature, your child may begin to ask a lot of questions. To help your child understand his birth history, you'll want to respond to his questions truthfully. This is not to say that all difficult information must be given at this stage, but the facts we offer should be based on the truth as we know it.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
Adoption Experts answer your questions.

Ask AF: When Mom Feels Hurt

My five-and-a-half-year-old said, "You are not my mother" to me when I gave her only half a cookie. Does she know how hurtful her statement was to me? She recently had some separation anxiety while I was away for three nights on a business trip. How do I get her to talk about her feelings and what is really bothering her?

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
Talking about adoption can lead to some big questions

Answering Kids’ Big Questions About Birth Parents

Between the ages of six and eight, children begin to ask more sophisticated questions about adoption. Here are some ways to respond.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
Adopted teens can use birth parents as a weapon when they're upset

Responding to “My Real Mom Would Let Me!”

When they're angry at us, teens may bring up the subject of birth parents. Here's how to answer calmly.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
Children will start to have adoption questions in preschool

Budding Curiosity – Adoption Talks with Preschoolers

Between the ages of three and five, children love hearing the story of how you became a family, and begin to ask their first, simple questions about adoption. AF takes you inside the mind of your preschooler, and offers tips for talking.

JOIN

Subscribe now for exclusive access to this article, future digital issues of Adoptive Families, the full searchable Adoption Parenting Library and much more.




Already a subscriber? LOG IN
[wppb-login] Need help? CLICK HERE
Newsletter

Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.
Please provide a valid email address.
Thank you for signing up! Your first Adoptive Families newsletter will arrive within the week.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Please fill in the required fields.
Top