Tag Archives: Deciding to Adopt

Older couple parenting in your forties or fifties or later

Crazy or Gutsy? Parenting in Your Forties and Fifties

Crazy or Gutsy? Parenting in Your Forties and Fifties

Older, wiser — and adopting more than ever.

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An adoptive mother and her son, a child with disabilities

“Great Non-Expectations”

The intense motherly love that washed over me after Jack's adoption was a shock to everyone — especially me.

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A man who was initially afraid of adoption, happy with his daughter, adopted from China

“I Needed This All Along”

Five years on: We have been “trying” for three years, and now are deep into the medical crapshoot of infertility treatment. Soon it becomes clear that we will never have our own biological children.

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Deciding to adopt

7 Common Questions When You’re Deciding to Adopt

When you bear or raise children, you step into the unknown. If you adopt, you take a step further. You can’t predict what baby would come from your own genetic mix, but you might recognize traits as the child grows up: “He’s got grandpa’s ears.” With an adopted child, there’s an element of mystery: “Where did that nose come from?”

Deciding Where to Adopt From

“Choosing Which Country to Adopt From (Twice)”

Growing up in a mostly white, Midwestern town in the late 1970s and early 80s, watching reruns of The Donna Reed Show and Leave It to Beaver, I figured I would finish school, find a girl to marry, buy a little house with a white picket fence, and have a couple of kids who looked like me. This was the middle-class American dream, and at the time it never occurred to me that life would turn out any other way.

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