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Mommy Far, Mommy Near

by Carol Antoinette Peacock, illustrated by Shawn Costello Brownell 32 pp. Morton Grove, Ill.: Albert Whitman. $14.95.



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Reviewed by Lianne Allison Fuju Remen, age 6, Sacramento, California

This book is wonderful. I like it a lot because it talks about the mommy near and mommy far. I think a lot about my birthmother too. I like the picture where it looks like Elizabeth is growing up, because it helps me imagine me growing up. I like where her mommy hugs her and says, "You are my child. You are my own. I love you forever. I adopt you now." I like it that her mommy says that to her.

I like when she is adopting her dolls, like her mommy adopted her. I thought it was funny when Elizabeth and her little sister were playing with their toy phones and her sister said, "Hello, China Mommy! What are you doing?" I like the part when Elizabeth told the China mommy about stringing shiny beads onto necklaces.

I know how Elizabeth feels about her birthmother. She feels sad and she misses her. When Elizabeth sees a Chinese girl with her Chinese mother, Elizabeth feels she wants her Chinese mother.

Elizabeth's mom tells her that her China mother couldn't keep her because China had too many babies, and her China mommy already had a baby. I don't think one baby is a good idea for China. I think that China should allow more babies, because then I could be with my Chinese mother when I want to. She should have made room for one more baby like me. Just like our family has two children.

I like the picture where Elizabeth is lying on her dog because she said her dog makes a good dog pillow. My mom says that adopting a dog is not the same as adopting children. Moms and dads make really serious promises to always take care of the children they adopt. That's what it means to be a forever family. Sometimes people sell or give away their pets, but that can never happen with children, whether they are adopted or born into their family. I know this, too, because I am an expert on adoption!

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