Author Archives: Deborah H. Johnson

Talking About Racism with Your Child: 5 Tips

5 Ways to Talk with Your Child About Racism

5 Ways to Talk with Your Child About Racism

Talking about racism makes most of us uncomfortable. Still, parents of transracially adopted children should resist the urge not to talk. Here's how.

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Helping transracially adopted teens answer questions about race from peers

Ask the Transracial Parenting Expert: Helping Teens Answer Questions About Race

"Last week, my teenage son told me that he was tired of having to explain himself wherever he goes. Why is this happening, and how can I help him?"

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Microaggressions can add up over time

Responding to “Invisible” Racism

Our society has gotten to the point where most people can agree that overt racism is wrong. Few would argue that segregation or using a racial slur is acceptable. But many more subtle forms of racism persist. Here's how to combat them.

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Read expert advice on answering rude adoption qeustions.

Answering Relatives’ Tricky Questions About Adoption

Adoptive parents are used to fielding questions about adoption — and most of us have an arsenal of replies to give the stranger in the checkout lane, but when it’s a family member making the rude remark, snappy comebacks don’t suffice.

Color Blindness and Race

Love Sees in Color

About a decade ago it was popular to say, “Love sees no color. I really don’t see that my kids are different.” I’m hoping we’ve moved away from that, because it’s just not true. We all notice differences, and, if we say we can’t, we’re denying something.

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