Tag Archives: Birth Family

Adoption Experts answer your questions.

Ask AF: Our First Visit with Our Child’s Birth Parents

Ask AF: Our First Visit with Our Child’s Birth Parents

A mother is nervous about the upcoming first birth family visit, wondering what it will be like, how to react if she or the birth mother get upset. Parents in open adoptions offer advice.

An illustration of adoptive families

“Which Ones Are Yours?”

There's this poem I'm supposed to love. I first read it when we adopted our oldest son: Not flesh of my flesh nor bone of my bone/But still miraculously my own./Never forget, for a single minute,/You didn't grow under my heart, but in it.

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brothers and sisters benefit from knowing about and seeing their birth siblings after adoption

Bringing Birth Siblings Into Our Children’s Stories—and Lives

The vast majority of our children have birth siblings, yet parents may wonder how to approach the topic. Adoptive parents, birth parents, and adoptees share how they talk about biological siblings, and build brother-sister bonds.

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in a family that's built through open adoption and step-relatives, more love is more love

“More Love Is More Love”

In many families, relationships come without exact names. While adoption highlighted this truth, it was already a given in my family—and maybe in yours, too?

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“Family Is Now” - Open Adoption and Changing Relationships

“Family Is Now”

What if my daughter doesn't choose me? What if she grows up and moves to live near her other mom—her birth mom? I think about that and I get scared. Then I think, so what if she does? I can’t worry about that; I can only parent now.

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"We Are All Adopted," by Veronica Chenik Gilmore

“We Are All Adopted”

From my own search for my roots through adopting older children from foster care, life has taught me to treasure my children’s biological connections while knowing that we don’t have to look alike to belong together.

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Whether you have an "open adoption" or a "closed adoption" in terms of contact, you can parent with an open heart

Parenting with an Open Heart

Whether you see your child’s birth parents frequently or have never had contact, you can still imbue your adoption and your relationship with your child with openness.

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An adoptee and her mother discussing her birth father reunion

“For the Love of My Child”

When Elizabeth was young, closed adoption was comfortable. But my outlook changed the day my teenage daughter said, "I want to find them."

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Setting boundaries in open adoption may be awkward, but it is necessary

Setting Boundaries in Open Adoption

In an open adoption, your child's birth parents become part of your extended family. Here are some common questions when it comes to managing those relationships.

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Kids need to piece together their adoption stories

Sharing Difficult Details with Your Child

Experts offer talking tips and sample language for discussing neglect, abuse, abandonment, and other painful parts of your child's adoption story.

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A daughter curious about her birth parents

“Googling Her Birth Parents”

Would it really be possible to fill out my daughter's hazy memories by typing names into a search engine?

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How to keep up contact with birth parents.

Keeping Up Contact with Birth Parents

An open adoption arrangement may be buffeted by passing time and changing circumstances. Here's how to make your relationship endure.

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Her daughter's birth family joined her in the hospital

“Welcomed By Our Daughter’s Birth Family”

I asked my family not to come to the hospital when she was born, then mourned their absence. Enter her birth relatives.

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Adopted teens can use birth parents as a weapon when they're upset

Responding to “My Real Mom Would Let Me!”

When they're angry at us, teens may bring up the subject of birth parents. Here's how to answer calmly.

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An image of a holiday letter to birth family

What to Share in the Holiday Letter to Birth Family

It's normal to think about your child's birth family during the holidays. What should you share in a holiday letter?

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